This center was supported by the National Science Foundation Award #EEC-0832785

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360 Huntington Ave., Boston, Massachusetts 02115

617.373.2000 · TTY 617.373.3768

© 2017 Northeastern University

Glen P. Miller

 

Associate Director
Department of Chemistry
University of New Hampshire
Email: glen.miller@unh.edu
Phone: (603) 862-2456
Website

 

Education

B.S., 1987, Clarkson University

Ph.D., 1991, Clarkson University

 

 

 

 

Biography

 

Postdoctoral Scholar, Exxon Research & Engineering Co., 1990-1992

Research Chemist, Exxon Research & Engineering Co., 1992-1993

Senior Chemist, Exxon Research & Engineering Co., 1993-1995

Adjunct Professor, Northampton Community College, Bethlehem, PA, 1992-95

Assistant Professor, University of New Hampshire, 1995-2001

Associate Professor, University of New Hampshire, 2001-2006

Professor, University of New Hampshire, 2006-present

Associate Director, NSF sponsored Nanoscale Science & Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing, 2004-present

Director, Materials Science Program, University of New Hampshire, 2009-present

Founder & Chief Technical Officer, Innovacene, Inc., 2010-present

Excellence in Teaching Award, College of Engineering & Physical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, 2000

Faculty Scholar Award, University of New Hampshire, 2002

Class of 1944 Named Professor, 2008-present

Director of New Hampshire Nanotech Outreach Activities for K-12 Students & Teachers, 2004-present

 

Glen P. Miller is Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science, Director of the Materials Science Program and Associate Director of the NSF funded Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center for High-Rate Nanomanufacturing (CHN), all at the University of New Hampshire. He is an authority in the area of nanostructured carbons including fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and large acenes. His group has successfully synthesized and characterized many nanostructures and organic compounds including C3vC60H18, bis and tris-[60]fullerene adducts of large acenes, hydrogenated SWNTs, fullerene nanotubes (a.k.a., fullerene nanowhiskers), photooxidatively resistant acene derivatives including pentacenes (most recently a water soluble pentacene), heptacenes and nonacenes. He also developed a new, tip-based nanopatterning technique called FAN (Field-Assisted Nanopatterning) that has been utilized to deposit organic compounds, polymers, fullerenes, metals, salts and nanoparticles on a variety of sustrates with nanoscale precision. In addition to his research activities, Glen Miller directs nanotechnology outreach activities for NH's K-12 teachers. Activities include an annual Nanotechnology K-12 Teachers Conference, presentations, laboratory experiments for K-12 students, plus REU and RET programs.

 

Teaching Interests

 

Glen Miller has taught 20 different courses at the University of New Hampshire, the majority of them focussing on Organic Chemistry and Physical Organic Chemistry at either the undergraduate or graduate levels, as well as Spectroscopy for upper level undergraduates and graduate students. He is currently teaching the classic 2 semester Organic Chemistry sequence to 250+ undergraduates including pre-Med, pre-Vet, pre-Dental, biology and select engineering majors.

 

Research Areas

 

Long-lived organic semiconductors for thin-film organic electronics

Chemistries of nanostructured carbons (fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, graphene)

Physical Organic Chemistry with a strong synthetic component

 

 

Select Publications

  • “An Improved Synthesis of Pentacene: Rapid Access to a Benchmark Organic Semiconductor,” Molecules, 2012, 17, 4625-4633.

  • “Probing Intramolecular CH – π Interactions in o-Quinodimethane Adducts of [60]Fullerene Using Variable Temperature NMR,” J. Org. Chem., 2012, 77, 1308−1315.

  • “Highly Ordered Assembly of Single-Domain Dichloropentacene over Large Areas on Vicinal Gold Surfaces,” ACS Nano, 2011, 5, 1792-7.

  • “Open-Shell Singlet Character of Stable Derivatives of Nonacene, Hexacene and Teranthene,” Org. Lett. 2011, 13, 3316-9.

  • “Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of a Persistent Nonacene Derivative,” J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132, 1261-1263.

  • “Exploiting substituent effects for the synthesis of a photooxidatively resistent heptacene derivative,” J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 2009, 131, 3424–3425.

  • “Molecular self-assembly of funtionalized fullerenes on a metal surface,” Phys. Rev. Lett., 2009, 102, 056102-1 - 056102-4.

  • “Field–assisted nanopatterning of metals, metal oxides and metal salts,” Nanotechnology, 2009, 20, 055303-1 – 055303-6.

  • “Substituent Effects in Pentacenes: Gaining Control Over HOMO-LUMO Gaps and Photooxidative Resistances,” J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 16274–16286.

  • “Hydrogenation of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Using Polyamine Reagents: Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study,” J. Amer. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 2296-2303.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

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